Repository revision
repository tip
Select a revision to inspect and download versions of Galaxy utilities from this repository.

Repository 'clustalomega'
http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/clustalomega/clustalomega
clustalomega
unrestricted
multiple sequence alignment program for proteins
Clustal Omega is a general purpose multiple sequence alignment program for proteins. It produces high quality alignments and is capable of handling datasets of hundreds of thousands of sequences in a reasonable time.
2:bb1847435ec1
clustalomega
True
323

Repository README files - may contain important installation or license information



CLUSTAL-OMEGA is a general purpose multiple sequence alignment program
for proteins.



INTRODUCTION

Clustal-Omega is a general purpose multiple sequence alignment (MSA)
program for proteins. It produces high quality MSAs and is capable of
handling data-sets of hundreds of thousands of sequences in reasonable
time.

In default mode, users give a file of sequences to be aligned and
these are clustered to produce a guide tree and this is used to guide
a "progressive alignment" of the sequences.  There are also facilities
for aligning existing alignments to each other, aligning a sequence to
an alignment and for using a hidden Markov model (HMM) to help guide
an alignment of new sequences that are homologous to the sequences
used to make the HMM.  This latter procedure is referred to as
"external profile alignment" or EPA.

Clustal-Omega uses HMMs for the alignment engine, based on the HHalign
package from Johannes Soeding [1]. Guide trees are made using an
enhanced version of mBed [2] which can cluster very large numbers of
sequences in O(N*log(N)) time. Multiple alignment then proceeds by
aligning larger and larger alignments using HHalign, following the
clustering given by the guide tree.

In its current form Clustal-Omega can only align protein sequences but
not DNA/RNA sequences. It is envisioned that DNA/RNA will become
available in a future version.



SEQUENCE INPUT:

-i, --in, --infile={<file>,-}
Multiple sequence input file (- for stdin)

--hmm-in=<file>
HMM input files

--dealign
Dealign input sequences

--profile1, --p1=<file>
Pre-aligned multiple sequence file (aligned columns will be kept fixed)

--profile2, --p2=<file>
Pre-aligned multiple sequence file (aligned columns will be kept fixed)


For sequence and profile input Clustal-Omega uses the Squid library
from Sean Eddy [3].


Clustal-Omega accepts 3 types of sequence input: (i) a sequence file
with un-aligned or aligned sequences, (ii) profiles (a multiple
alignment in a file) of aligned sequences, (iii) a HMM. Valid
combinations of the above are:

(a) one file with un-aligned or aligned sequences (i); the sequences
    will be aligned, and the alignment will be written out. For this
    mode use the -i flag. If the sequences are aligned (all sequences
    have the same length and at least one sequence has at least one
    gap), then the alignment is turned into a HMM, the sequences are
    de-aligned and the now un-aligned sequences are aligned using the
    HMM as an External Profile for External Profile Alignment (EPA).
    If no EPA is desired use the --dealign flag.

    Use the above option to make a multiple alignment from a set of
    sequences. A sequence file must contain more than one sequence (at
    least two sequences).

(b) two profiles (ii)+(ii); the columns in each profile will be kept
    fixed and the alignment of the two profiles will be written
    out. Use the --p1 and --p2 flags for this mode.

    Use this option to align two alignments (profiles) together.

(c) one file with un/aligned sequences (i) and one profile (ii); the
    profile is converted into a HMM and the un-aligned sequences will
    be multiply aligned (using the HMM background information) to form
    a profile; this constructed profile is aligned with the input
    profile; the columns in each profile (the original one and the one
    created from the un-aligned sequences) will be kept fixed and the
    alignment of the two profiles will be written out. Use the -i flag
    in conjunction with the --p1 flag for this mode.
      The un/aligned sequences file (i) must contain at least two
    sequences. If a single sequence has to be aligned with a profile
    the profile-profile option (b) has to be used.

    Use the above option to add new sequences to an existing
    alignment.

(d) one file with un-aligned sequences (i) and one HMM (iii); the
    un-aligned sequences will be aligned to form a profile, using the
    HMM as an External Profile. So far only one HMM can be input and
    only HMMer2 and HMMer3 formats are allowed. The alignment will be
    written out; the HMM information is discarded. As, at the moment,
    only one HMM can be used, no HMM is produced if the sequences are
    already aligned. Use the -i flag in conjunction with the --hmm-in
    flag for this mode. Multiple HMMs can be inputted, however, in the
    current version all but the first HMM will be ignored.

    Use this option to make a new multiple alignment of sequences from
    the input file and use the HMM as a guide (EPA).


Invalid combinations of the above are:

(v) an un/aligned sequence file containing just one sequence (i)

(w) an un/aligned sequence file containing just one sequence and a profile
    (i)+(ii)

(x) an un/aligned sequence file containing just one sequence and a HMM
    (i)+(iii)

(y) two or more HMMs (iii)+(iii)+... cannot be aligned to one another.

(z) one profile (ii) cannot be aligned with a HMM (iii)


The following MSA file formats are allowed:

    a2m=fasta, (vienna)
    clustal,
    msf,
    phylip,
    selex,
    stockholm


Prior to MSA, Clustal-Omega de-aligns all sequence input (i). However,
alignment information is automatically converted into a HMM and used
during MSA, unless the --dealign flag is specifically set.  Profiles
(ii) are not de-aligned.

The Clustal-Omega alignment engine can at the moment not process
DNA/RNA. If a sequence input file (i) or a profile (ii) is interpreted
as DNA/RNA the program will terminate during the file input stage.



CLUSTERING:

  --distmat-in=<file>
Pairwise distance matrix input file (skips distance computation)

  --distmat-out=<file>
Pairwise distance matrix output file

  --guidetree-in=<file>
Guide tree input file
(skips distance computation and guide tree clustering step)

  --guidetree-out=<file>
Guide tree output file

  --full
Use full distance matrix for guide-tree calculation (slow; mBed is default)

  --full-iter
Use full distance matrix for guide-tree calculation during iteration (mBed is default)


In order to produce a multiple alignment Clustal-Omega requires a
guide tree which defines the order in which sequences/profiles are
aligned. A guide tree in turn is constructed, based on a distance
matrix. Conventionally, this distance matrix is comprised of all the
pair-wise distances of the sequences. The distance measure
Clustal-Omega uses for pair-wise distances of un-aligned sequences is
the k-tuple measure [4], which was also implemented in Clustal 1.83
and ClustalW2 [5,6]. If the sequences inputted via -i are aligned
Clustal-Omega uses the Kimura-corrected pairwise aligned identities
[7]. The computational effort (time/memory) to calculate and store a
full distance matrix grows quadratically with the number of sequences.
Clustal-Omega can improve this scalability to N*log(N) by employing a
fast clustering algorithm called mBed [2]; this option is
automatically invoked (default). If a full distance matrix evaluation
is desired, then the --full flag has to be set. The mBed mode
calculates a reduced set of pair-wise distances. These distances are
used in a k-means algorithm, that clusters at most 100 sequences. For
each cluster a full distance matrix is calculated. No full distance
matrix (of all input sequences) is calculated in mBed mode. If there
are less than 100 sequences in the input, then in effect a full
distance matrix is calculated in mBed mode, however, no distance
matrix can be outputted (see below).


Clustal-Omega uses Muscle's [8] fast UPGMA implementation to construct
its guide trees from the distance matrix. By default, the distance
matrix is used internally to construct the guide tree and is then
discarded. By specifying --distmat-out the internal distance matrix
can be written to file. This is only possible in --full mode. The
guide trees by default are used internally to guide the multiple
alignment and are then discarded. By specifying the --guidetree-out
option these internal guide trees can be written out to
file. Conversely, the distance calculation and/or guide tree building
stage can be skipped, by reading in a pre-calculated distance matrix
and/or pre-calculated guide tree. These options are invoked by
specifying the --distmat-in and/or --guidetree-in flags,
respectively. However, distance matrix reading is disabled in the
current version. By default, distance matrix and guide tree files are
not over-written, if a file with the specified name already exists. In
this case Clustal-Omega aborts during the command-line processing
stage. To force over-writing of already existing files use the --force
flag (see MISCELLANEOUS).  In mBed mode a full distance matrix cannot
be outputted, distance matrix output is only possible in --full mode.
mBed or --full distance mode do not affect the ability to write out
guide-trees.

Guide trees can be iterated to refine the alignment (see section
ITERATION). Clustal-Omega takes the alignment, that was produced
initially and constructs a new distance matrix from this alignment.
The distance measure used at this stage is the Kimura distance [7]. By
default, Clustal-Omega constructs a reduced distance matrix at this
stage using the mBed algorithm, which will then be used to create an
improved (iterated) new guide tree. To turn off mBed-like clustering
at this stage the --full-iter flag has to be set. While Kimura
distances in general are much faster to calculate than k-tuple
distances, time and memory requirements still scale quadratically with
the number of sequences and --full-iter clustering should only be
considered for smaller cases (<< 10,000 sequences).



ALIGNMENT OUTPUT:

  -o, --out, --outfile={file,-} Multiple sequence alignment output file (default: stdout)

  --outfmt={a2m=fa[sta],clu[stal],msf,phy[lip],selex,st[ockholm],vie[nna]} MSA output file format (default: fasta)


By default Clustal-Omega writes its results (alignments) to stdout. An
output file can be specified with the -o flag. Output to stdout is not
possible in verbose mode (-v, see MISCELLANEOUS) as verbose/debugging
messages would interfere with the alignment output.  By default,
alignment files are not over-written, if a file with the specified
name already exists. In this case Clustal-Omega aborts during the
command-line processing stage. To force over-writing of already
existing files use the --force flag (see MISCELLANEOUS).

Clustal-Omega can output alignments in various formats by setting the
--outfmt flag:

  * for Fasta format set: --outfmt=a2m  or  --outfmt=fa  or  --outfmt=fasta

  * for Clustal format set: --outfmt=clu  or  --outfmt=clustal

  * for Msf format: set --outfmt= msf

  * for Phylip format set: --outfmt=phy  or  --outfmt=phylip

  * for Selex format set: --outfmt=selex

  * for Stockholm format set: --outfmt=st  or  --outfmt=stockholm

  * for Vienna format set: --outfmt=vie  or  --outfmt=vienna


ITERATION:

  --iterations, --iter=<n>  Number of (combined guide tree/HMM) iterations

  --max-guidetree-iterations=<n> Maximum guide tree iterations

  --max-hmm-iterations=<n>  Maximum number of HMM iterations


By default, Clustal-Omega calculates (or reads in) a guide tree and
performs a multiple alignment in the order specified by this guide
tree. This alignment is then outputted. Clustal-Omega can 'iterate'
its guide tree. The hope is that the (Kimura) distances, that can be
derived from the initial alignment, will give rise to a better guide
tree, and by extension, to a better alignment.

A similar rationale applies to HMM-iteration. MSAs in general are very
'vulnerable' at their early stages. Sequences that are aligned at an
early stage remain fixed for the rest of the MSA. Another way of
putting this is: 'once a gap, always a gap'. This behaviour can be
mitigated by HMM iteration. An initial alignment is created and turned
into a HMM. This HMM can help in a new round of MSA to 'anticipate'
where residues should align. This is using the HMM as an External
Profile and carrying out iterative EPA.  In practice, individual
sequences and profiles are aligned to the External HMM, derived after
the initial alignment. Pseudo-count information is then transferred to
the (internal) HMM, corresponding to the individual
sequence/profile. The now somewhat 'softened' sequences/profiles are
then in turn aligned in the order specified by the guide
tree. Pseudo-count transfer is reduced with the size of the
profile. Individual sequences attain the greatest pseudo-count
transfer, larger profiles less so. Pseudo-count transfer to profiles
larger than, say, 10 is negligible. The effect of HMM iteration is
more pronounced in larger test sets (that is, with more sequences).

Both, HMM- and guide tree-iteration come at a cost of increasing the
run-time. One round of guide tree iteration adds on (roughly) the time
it took to construct the initial alignment. If, for example, the
initial alignment took 1min, then it will take (roughly) 2min to
iterate the guide tree once, 3min to iterate the guide tree twice, and
so on. HMM-iteration is more costly, as each round of iteration adds
three times the time required for the alignment stage. For example, if
the initial alignment took 1min, then each additional round of HMM
iteration will add on 3min; so 4 iterations will take 13min
(=1min+4*3min). The factor of 3 stems from the fact that at every
stage both intermediate profiles have to be aligned with the
background HMM, and finally the (softened) HMMs have to be aligned as
well. All times are quoted for single processors.

By default, guide tree iteration and HMM-iteration are coupled. This
means, at each iteration step both, guide tree and HMM, are
re-calculated. This is invoked by setting the --iter flag. For
example, if --iter=1, then first an initial alignment is produced
(without external HMM background information and using k-tuple
distances to calculate the guide tree). This initial alignment is then
used to re-calculate a new guide tree (using Kimura distances) and to
create a HMM. The new guide tree and the HMM are then used to produce
a new MSA.

Iteration of guide tree and HMM can be de-coupled. This means that the
number of guide tree iterations and HMM iterations can be
different. This can be done by combining the --iter flag with the
--max-guidetree-iterations and/or the --max-hmm-iterations flag.  The
number of guide tree iterations is the minimum of --iter and
--max-guidetree-iterations, while the number of HMM iterations is the
minimum of --iter and --max-hmm-iterations.  If, for example, HMM
iteration should be performed 5 times but guide tree iteration should
be performed only 3 times, then one should set --iter=5 and
--max-guidetree-iterations=3. All three flags can be specified at the
same time (however, this makes no sense). It is not sufficient just to
specify --max-guidetree-iterations and --max-hmm-iterations but not
--iter. If any iteration is desired --iter has to be set.


LIMITS (will exit early, if exceeded):

  --maxnumseq=<n>           Maximum allowed number of sequences

  --maxseqlen=<l>           Maximum allowed sequence length

Limits can be imposed on the number of sequences in the input file
and/or the lengths of the sequences. This cap can be set with the
--maxnumseq and --maxseqlen flags, respectively. Clustal-Omega will
exit early, if these limits are exceeded.


MISCELLANEOUS:

  --auto                    Set options automatically (might overwrite some of your options)

  --threads=<n>             Number of processors to use

  -l, --log=<file>          Log all non-essential output to this file

  -h, --help                Print help and exit

  -v, --verbose             Verbose output (increases if given multiple times)

  --version                 Print version information and exit

  --long-version            Print long version information and exit

  --force                   Force file overwriting


Users may feel unsure which options are appropriate in certain
situations even though using ClustalO without any special options
should give you the desired results. The --auto flag tries to
alleviate this problem and selects accuracy/speed flags according to
the number of sequences. For all cases will use mBed and thereby
possibly overwrite the --full option. For more than 1,000 sequences
the iteration is turned off as the effect of iteration is more
noticeable for 'larger' problems. Otherwise iterations are set to 1 if
not already set to a higher value by the user. Expert users may want
to avoid this flag and exercise more fine tuned control by selecting
the appropriate options manually.

Certain parts of the MSA calculation have been parallelised. Most
noticeably, the distance matrix calculation, and certain aspects of
the HMM building stage. Clustal-Omega uses OpenMP. By default,
Clustal-Omega will attempt to use as many threads as possible. For
example, on a 4-core machine Clustal-Omega will attempt to use 4
threads. The number of threads can be limited by setting the --threads
flag. This may be desirable, for example, in the case of
benchmarking/timing.

Usually, non-essential (verbose) output is written to screen. This
output can be written to file by specifying the --log flag.

Help is available by specifying the -h flag.

By default Clustal-Omega does not print any information to stdout
(other than the final alignment, if no output file is
specified). Information concerning the progress of the alignment can
be obtained by specifying one verbosity flag (-v). This may be
desirable, to verify what Clustal-Omega is actually doing at the
moment. If two verbosity flags (-v -v) are specified, command-line
flags (explicitly and implicitly set) are printed in addition to the
progress report.  Triple verbose level (-v -v -v) is the most verbose
level. In addition to single- and double-verbose information much more
information is displayed: input sequences and names, details of the
tree construction and intermediate alignments. Tree construction
information includes pairwise distances. The number of pairwise
distances scales with the square of the number of sequences, and
double verbose mode is probably only useful for a small number of
sequences.

The current version number of Clustal-Omega can be displayed by
setting the --version flag.

The current version number of Clustal-Omega as well as the code-name
and the build date can be displayed by setting the --long-version
flag.

By default, Clustal-Omega does not over-write files. These can be (i)
alignment output, (ii) distance matrix and (iii) guide
tree. Overwriting can be forced by setting the --force flag.


EXAMPLES:

./clustalo -i globin.fa

Clustal-Omega reads the sequence file globin.fa, aligns the sequences
and prints the result to screen in fasta/a2m format.


./clustalo -i globin.fa -o globin.sto --outfmt=st

If the file globin.sto does not exist, then Clustal-Omega reads the
sequence file globin.fa, aligns the sequences and prints the result to
globin.sto in Stockholm format. If the file globin.sto does exist
already, then Clustal-Omega terminates the alignment process before
reading globin.fa.


./clustalo -i globin.fa -o globin.aln --outfmt=clu --force

Clustal-Omega reads the sequence file globin.fa, aligns the sequences
and prints the result to globin.aln in Clustal format, overwriting the
file globin.aln, if it already exists.


./clustalo -i globin.fa --distmat-out=globin.mat --guidetree-out=globin.dnd --force

Clustal-Omega reads the sequence file globin.fa, aligns the sequences,
prints the result to screen in fasta/a2m format (default), the guide
tree to globin.dnd and the distance matrix to globin.mat, overwriting
those files if they already exist.


./clustalo -i globin.fa --guidetree-in=globin.dnd

Clustal-Omega reads the files globin.fa and globin.dnd, skipping
distance calculation and guide tree creation, using instead the guide
tree specified in globin.dnd.


./clustalo -i globin.fa --hmm-in=PF00042.hmm

Clustal-Omega reads the sequence file globin.fa and the HMM file
PF00042.hmm (in HMMer2 or HMMer3 format).  It then performs the
alignment, transferring pseudo-count information contained in
PF00042.hmm to the sequences/profiles during the MSA.


./clustalo -i globin.sto

Clustal-Omega reads the file globin.sto (of aligned sequences in
Stockholm format). It converts the alignment into a HMM, de-aligns the
sequences and re-aligns them, transferring pseudo-count information to
the sequences/profiles during the MSA. The guide tree is constructed
using a full distance matrix of Kimura distances.


./clustalo -i globin.sto  --dealign

Clustal-Omega reads the file globin.sto (of aligned sequences in
Stockholm format). It de-aligns the sequences and then re-aligns
them. No HMM is produced in the process, no pseudo-count information
is transferred. Consequently, the output must be the same as for
unaligned output (like in the first example ./clustalo -i globin.fa)


./clustalo -i globin.fa --iter=2

Clustal-Omega reads the file globin.fa, creates a UPGMA guide tree
built from k-tuple distances, and performs an initial alignment. This
initial alignment is converted into a HMM and a new guide tree is
built from the Kimura distances of the initial alignment. The
un-aligned sequences are then aligned (for the second time but this
time) using pseudo-count information from the HMM created after the
initial alignment (and using the new guide tree). This second
alignment is then again converted into a HMM and a new guide tree is
constructed. The un-aligned sequences are then aligned (for a third
time), again using pseudo-count information of the HMM from the
previous step and the most recent guide tree. The final alignment is
written to screen.


./clustalo -i globin.fa --iter=5 --max-guidetree-iterations=1

Clustal-Omega reads the file globin.fa, creates a UPGMA guide tree
built from k-tuple distances, and performs an initial alignment. This
initial alignment is converted into a HMM and a new guide tree is
built from the Kimura distances of the initial alignment. The
un-aligned sequences are then aligned (for the second time but this
time) using pseudo-count information from the HMM created after the
initial alignment (and using the new guide tree). For the last 4
iterations the guide tree is left unchanged and only HMM iteration is
performed. This means that intermediate alignments are converted to
HMMs, and these intermediate HMMs are used to guide the MSA during
subsequent iteration stages.


./clustalo -i globin.fa -o globin.a2m -v

In case the file globin.a2m does not exist, Clustal-Omega reads the
file globin.fa, prints a progress report to screen and writes the
alignment in (default) Fasta format to globin.a2m. The progress report
consists of the number of threads used, the number of sequences read,
the current progress in the k-tuple distance calculation, completion
of the guide tree computation and current progress of the MSA stage.
If the file globin.a2m already exists Clustal-Omega aborts before
reading the file globin.fa. Note that in verbose mode an output file
has to be specified, because progress/debugging information, which is
printed to screen, would interfere with the alignment being printed to
screen.


./clustalo -i PF00042_full.fa --dealign --full --outfmt=vie -o PF00042_full.vie --force

Clustal-Omega reads the file PF00042_full.fa. This file contains
several thousand aligned sequences. --dealign tells Clustal-Omega to
erase all alignment information and re-align the sequences from
scratch. As there are several thousand sequences calculating a full
distance matrix may be slow. Setting the --full flag specifically
selects the full distance mode over the default mBed mode. The
alignment is then written out in Vienna format (fasta format all on
one line, no line breaks per sequence) to file PF00042_full.vie.


./clustalo -i PF00042_full.fa --dealign --outfmt=vie -o PF00042_full.vie --force

Clustal-Omega reads the file PF00042_full.fa. This file contains
several thousand aligned sequences. --dealign tells Clustal-Omega to
erase all alignment information and re-align the sequences from
scratch. Calculating the distance matrix will be done by mBed
(default). Clustal-Omega will calculate pairwise distances to a
small number of reference sequences only. This will give a significant
speed-up. The speed-up is greater for larger families (more
sequences). The alignment is then written out in Vienna format (fasta
format all on one line, no line breaks per sequence) to file
PF00042_full.vie.


./clustalo --p1=globin.sto --p2=PF00042_full.vie -o globin+pf00042.fa

Clustal-Omega reads files globin.sto and PF00042_full.vie of aligned
sequences (profiles). Both profiles are then aligned. The relative
positions of residues in both profiles are not changed during this
alignment, however, columns of gaps may be inserted into the profiles,
respectively. The final alignment is written to file globin+pf00042.fa
in fasta format.


./clustalo -i globin.fa --p1=PF00042_full.vie -o pf00042+globin.fa

Clustal-Omega reads file globin.fa of un-aligned sequences and the
profile (of aligned sequences) in file PF00042_full.vie. A HMM is
created from the profile. This HMM is used to guide the alignment of
the un-aligned sequences in globin.fa. The profile that was generated
during this alignment of un-aligned globin.fa sequences is then
aligned to the input profile PF00042_full.vie. The relative positions
of residues in profile PF00042_full.vie is not changed during this
alignment, however, columns of gaps may be inserted into the
profile. The final alignment is output to file pf00042+globin.fa in
fasta format. The alignment in this example may be slightly different
from the alignment in the previous example, because no HMM guidance
was used generate the profile globin.sto. In this example HMM guidance
was used to align the sequences in globin.fa; the hope being that this
intermediate alignment will have profited from the bigger profile.



LITERATURE:

[1] Johannes Soding (2005) Protein homology detection by HMM-HMM
    comparison. Bioinformatics 21 (7): 951–960.

[2] Blackshields G, Sievers F, Shi W, Wilm A, Higgins DG.  Sequence
    embedding for fast construction of guide trees for multiple
    sequence alignment.  Algorithms Mol Biol. 2010 May 14;5:21.

[3] http://www.genetics.wustl.edu/eddy/software/#squid

[4] Wilbur and Lipman, 1983; PMID 6572363

[5] Thompson JD, Higgins DG, Gibson TJ.  (1994). CLUSTAL W: improving
    the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through
    sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight
    matrix choice. Nucleic Acids Res., 22, 4673-4680.

[6] Larkin MA, Blackshields G, Brown NP, Chenna R, McGettigan PA,
    McWilliam H, Valentin F, Wallace IM, Wilm A, Lopez R, Thompson JD,
    Gibson TJ, Higgins DG.  (2007). Clustal W and Clustal X version
    2.0. Bioinformatics, 23, 2947-2948.

[7] Kimura M (1980). "A simple method for estimating evolutionary
    rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of
    nucleotide sequences". Journal of Molecular Evolution 16: 111–120.

[8] Edgar, R.C. (2004) MUSCLE: multiple sequence alignment with high
    accuracy and high throughput.Nucleic Acids Res. 32(5):1792-1797.

The impatient can try:

$ ./configure
$ make
$ make install


Clustal-Omega needs argtable2 (http://argtable.sourceforge.net/). If
argtable2 is installed in a non-standard directory you might have to
point configure to its installation directory. For example, if you are
on a Mac and have argtable installed via MacPorts then you should use
the following command line:

$ ./configure CFLAGS='-I/opt/local/include' LDFLAGS='-L/opt/local/lib'

ClustalO will automatically support multi-threading if your compiler
supports OpenMP. For some reason automake's OpenMP detection for
Apple's gcc is broken. You can force OpenMP detection by calling configure 
like so:

$ ./configure OPENMP_CFLAGS='-fopenmp' CFLAGS='-DHAVE_OPENMP'

You could use a non-Apple gcc installed via MacPorts, adding

CC=/opt/local/bin/gcc-mp-4.5

to the configure call (you will have to change the exact string to match
your gcc version).

See below for generic installation instructions:

----------------------------------------------------------------------



Installation Instructions
*************************

Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005,
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

   Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification,
are permitted in any medium without royalty provided the copyright
notice and this notice are preserved.  This file is offered as-is,
without warranty of any kind.

Basic Installation
==================

   Briefly, the shell commands `./configure; make; make install' should
configure, build, and install this package.  The following
more-detailed instructions are generic; see the `README' file for
instructions specific to this package.  Some packages provide this
`INSTALL' file but do not implement all of the features documented
below.  The lack of an optional feature in a given package is not
necessarily a bug.  More recommendations for GNU packages can be found
in *note Makefile Conventions: (standards)Makefile Conventions.

   The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation.  It uses
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
definitions.  Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
debugging `configure').

   It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring.  Caching is
disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
cache files.

   If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
to figure out how `configure' could check whether to do them, and mail
diffs or instructions to the address given in the `README' so they can
be considered for the next release.  If you are using the cache, and at
some point `config.cache' contains results you don't want to keep, you
may remove or edit it.

   The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
`configure' by a program called `autoconf'.  You need `configure.ac' if
you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using a newer version
of `autoconf'.

   The simplest way to compile this package is:

  1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
     `./configure' to configure the package for your system.

     Running `configure' might take a while.  While running, it prints
     some messages telling which features it is checking for.

  2. Type `make' to compile the package.

  3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
     the package, generally using the just-built uninstalled binaries.

  4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
     documentation.  When installing into a prefix owned by root, it is
     recommended that the package be configured and built as a regular
     user, and only the `make install' phase executed with root
     privileges.

  5. Optionally, type `make installcheck' to repeat any self-tests, but
     this time using the binaries in their final installed location.
     This target does not install anything.  Running this target as a
     regular user, particularly if the prior `make install' required
     root privileges, verifies that the installation completed
     correctly.

  6. You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
     source code directory by typing `make clean'.  To also remove the
     files that `configure' created (so you can compile the package for
     a different kind of computer), type `make distclean'.  There is
     also a `make maintainer-clean' target, but that is intended mainly
     for the package's developers.  If you use it, you may have to get
     all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
     with the distribution.

  7. Often, you can also type `make uninstall' to remove the installed
     files again.  In practice, not all packages have tested that
     uninstallation works correctly, even though it is required by the
     GNU Coding Standards.

  8. Some packages, particularly those that use Automake, provide `make
     distcheck', which can by used by developers to test that all other
     targets like `make install' and `make uninstall' work correctly.
     This target is generally not run by end users.

Compilers and Options
=====================

   Some systems require unusual options for compilation or linking that
the `configure' script does not know about.  Run `./configure --help'
for details on some of the pertinent environment variables.

   You can give `configure' initial values for configuration parameters
by setting variables in the command line or in the environment.  Here
is an example:

     ./configure CC=c99 CFLAGS=-g LIBS=-lposix

   *Note Defining Variables::, for more details.

Compiling For Multiple Architectures
====================================

   You can compile the package for more than one kind of computer at the
same time, by placing the object files for each architecture in their
own directory.  To do this, you can use GNU `make'.  `cd' to the
directory where you want the object files and executables to go and run
the `configure' script.  `configure' automatically checks for the
source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.  This
is known as a "VPATH" build.

   With a non-GNU `make', it is safer to compile the package for one
architecture at a time in the source code directory.  After you have
installed the package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before
reconfiguring for another architecture.

   On MacOS X 10.5 and later systems, you can create libraries and
executables that work on multiple system types--known as "fat" or
"universal" binaries--by specifying multiple `-arch' options to the
compiler but only a single `-arch' option to the preprocessor.  Like
this:

     ./configure CC="gcc -arch i386 -arch x86_64 -arch ppc -arch ppc64" \
                 CXX="g++ -arch i386 -arch x86_64 -arch ppc -arch ppc64" \
                 CPP="gcc -E" CXXCPP="g++ -E"

   This is not guaranteed to produce working output in all cases, you
may have to build one architecture at a time and combine the results
using the `lipo' tool if you have problems.

Installation Names
==================

   By default, `make install' installs the package's commands under
`/usr/local/bin', include files under `/usr/local/include', etc.  You
can specify an installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving
`configure' the option `--prefix=PREFIX', where PREFIX must be an
absolute file name.

   You can specify separate installation prefixes for
architecture-specific files and architecture-independent files.  If you
pass the option `--exec-prefix=PREFIX' to `configure', the package uses
PREFIX as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
Documentation and other data files still use the regular prefix.

   In addition, if you use an unusual directory layout you can give
options like `--bindir=DIR' to specify different values for particular
kinds of files.  Run `configure --help' for a list of the directories
you can set and what kinds of files go in them.  In general, the
default for these options is expressed in terms of `${prefix}', so that
specifying just `--prefix' will affect all of the other directory
specifications that were not explicitly provided.

   The most portable way to affect installation locations is to pass the
correct locations to `configure'; however, many packages provide one or
both of the following shortcuts of passing variable assignments to the
`make install' command line to change installation locations without
having to reconfigure or recompile.

   The first method involves providing an override variable for each
affected directory.  For example, `make install
prefix=/alternate/directory' will choose an alternate location for all
directory configuration variables that were expressed in terms of
`${prefix}'.  Any directories that were specified during `configure',
but not in terms of `${prefix}', must each be overridden at install
time for the entire installation to be relocated.  The approach of
makefile variable overrides for each directory variable is required by
the GNU Coding Standards, and ideally causes no recompilation.
However, some platforms have known limitations with the semantics of
shared libraries that end up requiring recompilation when using this
method, particularly noticeable in packages that use GNU Libtool.

   The second method involves providing the `DESTDIR' variable.  For
example, `make install DESTDIR=/alternate/directory' will prepend
`/alternate/directory' before all installation names.  The approach of
`DESTDIR' overrides is not required by the GNU Coding Standards, and
does not work on platforms that have drive letters.  On the other hand,
it does better at avoiding recompilation issues, and works well even
when some directory options were not specified in terms of `${prefix}'
at `configure' time.

Optional Features
=================

   If the package supports it, you can cause programs to be installed
with an extra prefix or suffix on their names by giving `configure' the
option `--program-prefix=PREFIX' or `--program-suffix=SUFFIX'.

   Some packages pay attention to `--enable-FEATURE' options to
`configure', where FEATURE indicates an optional part of the package.
They may also pay attention to `--with-PACKAGE' options, where PACKAGE
is something like `gnu-as' or `x' (for the X Window System).  The
`README' should mention any `--enable-' and `--with-' options that the
package recognizes.

   For packages that use the X Window System, `configure' can usually
find the X include and library files automatically, but if it doesn't,
you can use the `configure' options `--x-includes=DIR' and
`--x-libraries=DIR' to specify their locations.

   Some packages offer the ability to configure how verbose the
execution of `make' will be.  For these packages, running `./configure
--enable-silent-rules' sets the default to minimal output, which can be
overridden with `make V=1'; while running `./configure
--disable-silent-rules' sets the default to verbose, which can be
overridden with `make V=0'.

Particular systems
==================

   On HP-UX, the default C compiler is not ANSI C compatible.  If GNU
CC is not installed, it is recommended to use the following options in
order to use an ANSI C compiler:

     ./configure CC="cc -Ae -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=500"

and if that doesn't work, install pre-built binaries of GCC for HP-UX.

   On OSF/1 a.k.a. Tru64, some versions of the default C compiler cannot
parse its `<wchar.h>' header file.  The option `-nodtk' can be used as
a workaround.  If GNU CC is not installed, it is therefore recommended
to try

     ./configure CC="cc"

and if that doesn't work, try

     ./configure CC="cc -nodtk"

   On Solaris, don't put `/usr/ucb' early in your `PATH'.  This
directory contains several dysfunctional programs; working variants of
these programs are available in `/usr/bin'.  So, if you need `/usr/ucb'
in your `PATH', put it _after_ `/usr/bin'.

   On Haiku, software installed for all users goes in `/boot/common',
not `/usr/local'.  It is recommended to use the following options:

     ./configure --prefix=/boot/common

Specifying the System Type
==========================

   There may be some features `configure' cannot figure out
automatically, but needs to determine by the type of machine the package
will run on.  Usually, assuming the package is built to be run on the
_same_ architectures, `configure' can figure that out, but if it prints
a message saying it cannot guess the machine type, give it the
`--build=TYPE' option.  TYPE can either be a short name for the system
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name which has the form:

     CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM

where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:

     OS
     KERNEL-OS

   See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field.  If
`config.sub' isn't included in this package, then this package doesn't
need to know the machine type.

   If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
use the option `--target=TYPE' to select the type of system they will
produce code for.

   If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
platform different from the build platform, you should specify the
"host" platform (i.e., that on which the generated programs will
eventually be run) with `--host=TYPE'.

Sharing Defaults
================

   If you want to set default values for `configure' scripts to share,
you can create a site shell script called `config.site' that gives
default values for variables like `CC', `cache_file', and `prefix'.
`configure' looks for `PREFIX/share/config.site' if it exists, then
`PREFIX/etc/config.site' if it exists.  Or, you can set the
`CONFIG_SITE' environment variable to the location of the site script.
A warning: not all `configure' scripts look for a site script.

Defining Variables
==================

   Variables not defined in a site shell script can be set in the
environment passed to `configure'.  However, some packages may run
configure again during the build, and the customized values of these
variables may be lost.  In order to avoid this problem, you should set
them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'.  For example:

     ./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc

causes the specified `gcc' to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
overridden in the site shell script).

Unfortunately, this technique does not work for `CONFIG_SHELL' due to
an Autoconf bug.  Until the bug is fixed you can use this workaround:

     CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash /bin/bash ./configure CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash

`configure' Invocation
======================

   `configure' recognizes the following options to control how it
operates.

`--help'
`-h'
     Print a summary of all of the options to `configure', and exit.

`--help=short'
`--help=recursive'
     Print a summary of the options unique to this package's
     `configure', and exit.  The `short' variant lists options used
     only in the top level, while the `recursive' variant lists options
     also present in any nested packages.

`--version'
`-V'
     Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
     script, and exit.

`--cache-file=FILE'
     Enable the cache: use and save the results of the tests in FILE,
     traditionally `config.cache'.  FILE defaults to `/dev/null' to
     disable caching.

`--config-cache'
`-C'
     Alias for `--cache-file=config.cache'.

`--quiet'
`--silent'
`-q'
     Do not print messages saying which checks are being made.  To
     suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
     messages will still be shown).

`--srcdir=DIR'
     Look for the package's source code in directory DIR.  Usually
     `configure' can determine that directory automatically.

`--prefix=DIR'
     Use DIR as the installation prefix.  *note Installation Names::
     for more details, including other options available for fine-tuning
     the installation locations.

`--no-create'
`-n'
     Run the configure checks, but stop before creating any output
     files.

`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options.  Run
`configure --help' for more details.

Contents of this repository

Name Description Version
Clustal Omega multiple sequence alignment program for proteins 1.0.2

Automated tool test results

Time tested: 2014-04-23 07:46:18
System: Linux 3.8.0-30-generic
Architecture: x86_64
Python version: 2.7.4
Galaxy revision: 13181:7a7985a007fb
Galaxy database version: 118
Tool shed revision: 13123:e6876f691854
Tool shed database version: 22
Tool shed mercurial version: 2.2.3
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000000 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_unaligned_all.fasta'
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000001 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_aligned1.fasta'
Time tested: 2014-04-17 05:49:48
System: Linux 3.8.0-30-generic
Architecture: x86_64
Python version: 2.7.4
Galaxy revision: 13085:c05752549163
Galaxy database version: 118
Tool shed revision: 12961:888478c66456
Tool shed database version: 22
Tool shed mercurial version: 2.2.3
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000000 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_unaligned_all.fasta'
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000001 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_aligned1.fasta'
Time tested: 2014-04-16 05:44:14
System: Linux 3.8.0-30-generic
Architecture: x86_64
Python version: 2.7.4
Galaxy revision: 13065:1ad62c772728
Galaxy database version: 118
Tool shed revision: 12961:888478c66456
Tool shed database version: 22
Tool shed mercurial version: 2.2.3
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000000 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_unaligned_all.fasta'
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000001 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_aligned1.fasta'
Time tested: 2014-04-15 06:18:57
System: Linux 3.8.0-30-generic
Architecture: x86_64
Python version: 2.7.4
Galaxy revision: 13058:1165a5a1221a
Galaxy database version: 118
Tool shed revision: 12961:888478c66456
Tool shed database version: 22
Tool shed mercurial version: 2.2.3
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000000 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_unaligned_all.fasta'
Tool id: clustalomega
Tool version: clustalomega
Test: test_tool_000001 (functional.test_toolbox.TestForTool_toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/clustalomega/1.0.2)
Stderr:
Traceback:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 106, in test_tool
    self.do_it( td )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/functional/test_toolbox.py", line 29, in do_it
    stage_data_in_history( galaxy_interactor, testdef.test_data(), test_history, shed_tool_id )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 30, in stage_data_in_history
    upload_waits.append( galaxy_interactor.stage_data_async( test_data, history, shed_tool_id ) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/interactor.py", line 336, in stage_data_async
    wait=(not async) )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/test/base/twilltestcase.py", line 221, in upload_file
    tc.formfile( "tool_form", "file_data", filename )
  File "/var/opt/buildslaves/buildslave-ec2-1/buildbot-install-test-main-tool-shed-py27/build/eggs/twill-0.9-py2.7.egg/twill/commands.py", line 481, in formfile
    fp = open(filename, 'rb')
IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: u'/tmp/shed_tools/toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/repos/clustalomega/clustalomega/bb1847435ec1/clustalomega/.hg/store/data/clustalomega/test-data/clustalo_aligned1.fasta'

Categories
Fasta Manipulation
Sequence Analysis